All posts by Hong Tran

Exploring the Known Unknowns Using the Power of Metagenomics: Discovery of the crAssphage

By Connie Chen, Microbiology, ’15-’16

Author’s Note:

“Metagenomics is the study of genetic material directly from environmental samples such as the soil or the human gut. With whole metagenomic sequencing, it is possible to obtain and analyze every piece of genetic material in the sample. As we being to learn more about the world, it becomes evident that there is more that is unknown. The crAssphage is an example of a “known unknown” because through metagenomics, the virus’s genome has been built and certain properties can be interpreted from the genome, but it has never been seen under a microscope and there is much still unknown about the virus. Metagenomics have opened the doors to analyzing multiple sequences and determining the ecology of the environment. Because metagenomics is becoming more prevalent, it is essential to understand the potential of this growing field. I hope that by learning about the potential of metagenomics, new ideas can sprout from using this technology in order to help others.”

Continue reading Exploring the Known Unknowns Using the Power of Metagenomics: Discovery of the crAssphage

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The Infant Airway Microbiome Linked to Childhood Asthma

By Shivani Kamal, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, ’17

Author’s Note:

“I am pursing a career in pediatrics and wanted to familiarize myself with new research regarding health and development of children. I was amazed at the advancements of medical technology which allow us to understand diseases and create potential cures, previously never thought possible. My purpose for writing this review is to show scientific audiences the most current research on how bacteria in the respiratory microbiome has an impact on asthma. Recently, much research initiated by the Human Microbiome Projects (HMP) proved that the bacteria living on and inside humans contribute to the health and disease of the body. This review is meant to educate scientists on the most recent information on development of childhood asthma and prompt others to conduct future research on preventative treatments for the disease.”

Continue reading The Infant Airway Microbiome Linked to Childhood Asthma

What is Myasthenia Gravis?

By Shubhang Bhatt, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, ’15

Author’s Note:

“What is Myasthenia Gravis?” aims at informing the readers about the mechanism of action, symptoms, diagnosis, and treatment of Myasthenia Gravis. Fatigue and muscle weakness is something that today’s working population has learned to ignore, and this has prevented MG from early detection. Proper treatment is necessary for this potentially life-threatening condition. I decided to write about this topic after reading a case study for one of my internships. I hope the readers will look out for signs like the drooping of eyelids, muscle weakness, and difficulty in swallowing for the early detection of this rare autoimmune disease.”

Continue reading What is Myasthenia Gravis?

Human Health and Safety Impacts of Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin Consumption

By Danielle Kassatly, Genetics and Genomics, ’16

Author’s Note:

“This piece aspires to encourage consumers to critically interpret the scientific facts presented in everyday advertisements. Our society assumes that rBST and many other synthetic chemicals are detrimental to health, this essay emphasizes the importance of challenging fallacious argument in order to fairly evaluate the use of rBST.”

Continue reading Human Health and Safety Impacts of Recombinant Bovine Somatotropin Consumption

Blood pressure monitoring and antihypertensive treatment for dementia prevention: A Review

By Holly Lam, Human Development, ’16

Author’s Note:  

“I wrote this literature review as an assignment for UWP104F (Writing in the Professions: Health). We were able to choose any health problem of our interest and review current research pertaining to that topic. I chose to write about dementia particularly because it affects my grandmother. To this day, my family and I do not know how she went from being a fairly healthy 40 year old woman to being a person with Alzheimer’s disease. During my research, I came across an abundance of literature pertaining to the relationship between dementia and the blood supply to the brain. The notion of hypertension being a potential indicator of later dementia captured most of my interest given that it is relatively common in the US compared to other countries. What we can learn about the link between blood supply and the brain may give us a better understanding of dementia as well as insight for prevention.”

Continue reading Blood pressure monitoring and antihypertensive treatment for dementia prevention: A Review

Winter Seminar 2016: “Science Journalism and Editing: The Aggie Transcript”

The Aggie Transcript is offering its first-ever seminar on science journalism and editing in Winter Quarter 2016! Please see the flyer below for more information.

To read more about the course description, the goals of the seminar, course assignments and grading criteria, please visit the link and click “Seminar Schedule: Winter 2016”

Link: http://fys.ucdavis.edu/student/#frs-schedule

Winter Seminar 2016 Flyer-page-001(1)

Open Submissions Month: Health & Medicine

The Aggie Transcript is starting a new monthly collection of selected topics in science, in addition to our regular submissions.

For the month of November, we are currently accepting submissions in: Health & Medicine until Nov. 23rd, 2015.

Editorial Process:

  • Once the writer submits the paper, the editorial board will begin the reviewing process. An editor will be assigned to the paper and will be in charge of notifying the writer about our comments and suggestions. When the editorial board comes to an agreement that the paper is “ready for publication”, these featured reports will be published on our website along with a short, special description about the author.

Guidelines to submit:

  • Email your document to us at: aggietranscript@gmail.com by the deadline
  • As a featured author of the month, you will get to write a short blurb about yourself to be published alongside your submission entry

May the Odds Ever be in Your Favor

By Rayan Kaakati, Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior

Being born female automatically registers you in a game of Russian roulette: one out of eight women will have invasive breast cancer during their lives. Breast cancer is a disease that starts in the tissues of the breast and is statistically fatal for about one in thirty-six women (Breast Cancer Facts), but that does not mean it is a walk in the park for its survivors or even for women who end up not developing the disease. Continue reading May the Odds Ever be in Your Favor